Arthur Chi'en

Arthur Chi'en

Reporter

Arthur Chi'en is the Weekend Anchor for FOX 5 in New York.  The three-time Emmy Award-winning newscaster currently is also a general assignment reporter with duties that range widely from feature, investigative, and political stories to breaking news coverage including the Ebola outbreak, the death of Eric Garner, and the Charlie Hebdo terrorism case.

Chi'en attended Columbia University and began his journalism career at NBC News, working his way up as a producer for NBC's Nightly News with Tom Brokaw and as a New York Bureau producer for the Today Show.

As a member of the Specials Unit, he covered several high-profile events from hurricanes to plane crashes to major trials including the crash of TWA 800 and the Megan Kanka trial. His other major assignments there included the Oklahoma City bombing, the arrest and subsequent trial of O.J. Simpson, and election coverage for Decision 1994 and 1996.

Joining New York 1 in 1998, Arthur left the producing ranks and started reporting. He was assigned to a variety of subjects from hard news to features to investigative. While he found expertise in transportation, the September 11 attacks, and the clergy sex abuse scandal would constitute the bulk of his work in his time there.

Chi'en would eventually work for WFXT-TV in Boston before returning to New York as a correspondent at WCBS-TV and WPIX-TV where he covered national and international events such as Hurricane Sandy, the transit strike, and the devastating tsunami in Southeast Asia.

The latest from Arthur Chi'en

NYC businessman vying for NY casino license

New York is getting ready to hand out three casino licenses and the competition is fierce, with several big-name corporations vying for a spot. But that's not stopping a local businessman from throwing his hat into the ring.

How safe is your data with tap-and-go subway payments?

With the MTA's OMNY payment system for subways and buses about to complete its takeover next year, making the MetroCard a thing of the past, the technical upgrade in our lives to a real-time system tracking our every commuting move has some civil rights and privacy groups sounding the alarm that our freedom is at risk.